Priming surfaces in preparation for a lick of paint is more important than many people may realise. A job might look like it is done and dusted but chances are that without the proper priming technique and some dedicated time – looks will prove to be deceiving.

With today’s innovation in paint technology, any surface can be painted, and painted well, if the correct processes are followed. Invest in paint that is made for the surface you are painting and half the work is already done for you. Undercoats and primers are usually a safe bet whenever you want the job to last.

Invest in a universal undercoat

Paint technology has caught up with demand and finally there is a universal undercoat that can be applied before using enamel and other top-coats thanks to the excellent tooth it provides. Undercoats are quick-drying with a hard matt finish. The universal undercoat can even be used on steel, wood and previously painted walls, and it covers stubborn stains. This is perfect for exterior elements like trims, gutters, pipes, skirting, and window and door frames.

Look into specialised primers

Primer manufactured specifically for surfaces that are otherwise difficult to paint have also become available to the public. Now you can give your bathroom or kitchen a makeover without having to scrape together the cash to have the whole room retiled.

Undercoats like Epoxiprime will stick to even the most difficult of surfaces like Epoxi, Polyester, glass, tiles, damp cementitious surfaces and even some plastics. Remember Epoxiprime when seeking an undercoat or primer when painting a surface that does not typically take well to paint.

There is nothing you can’t colour, in exactly the way you want, if you invest in the right undercoat or primer. But you should still follow the required steps like sanding down previously painted wood surfaces before painting or patching cracks and holes in a wall before applying undercoating paint.

Primer vs. undercoat

The one magic rule when it comes to deciding on whether to use a primer or an undercoat is that all undercoats are primers but not all primers are undercoats; all thumbs are fingers but not all fingers are thumbs.

An undercoat provides a smooth, uniform surface in preparation for a top-coat. A primer seals, it hides stains and it bonds the surface to create tooth so that the next layer can be applied.

So when in doubt, prime and undercoat your surfaces.